Sansa Stark’s Glazed Lemon Cakes

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Who will win the Iron Throne (or what’s left of it)? Why did Hodor have to die, and what was the point of Bran’s endless journey and ability to see the past? When will Tyrion become brilliant again? Is Daenerys as crazy as her dad? And, finally, does Jon Snow really know nothing?

All will hopefully be answered during tonight’s Game of Thrones finale. What will surely be a hit, though, will be this lovely glazed lemon pound cake, baked to a sugar-crunch perfection and infused with citrus. Sansa Stark’s favorite treat was lemon cakes. Since lemons didn’t grow in the North and were incredibly expensive, it was a mark of wealth and status, and a symbol of her futile dreams of becoming a princess and then Queen of Westeros. Even through all of her suffering, friends and enemies alike would offer it to her as a small act of kindness and as a way of gaining her trust.

The secret to rich, moist cake with an even rise? Weighing your flour, and then sifting the dry ingredients together. Weighing your flour gives you a consistent result every time, and ensures the right ratio of solids to liquids. Note that one cup of flour equals 120 grams (I use metric because it is more precise in baking). So for this recipe, use 206 grams of flour.

Sifting evenly distributes the dry leavening agents (baking powder) and the inhibitors (salt), giving you an even finished product. My sifter is at least 34 years old, and still going strong.

Not feeling the love for squeezing lemons for the glaze? Not to worry. The bottled stuff is just fine, too. The realm will survive, better than it did after Daenerys’s last temper tantrum. I use a Microplane zester to get finely-grated lemon rind. Don’t go too far into the pith (white stuff) with your zester, as that can be somewhat bitter.

I used 5 mini-loaf pans to make plural “cakes” for the occasion, but you can use a bundt or two regular-sized loaf pans instead. Place the mini-loaf pans on a cookie sheet, and bake for 22-24 minutes, until a cake tester or toothpick comes out clean.

Look at this lovely, tender loaf, fit for a highborn lady.

Recipe

Sansa Stark's Glazed Lemon Cake

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 14 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 3 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp lemon oil
  • Finally grated rind of one lemon (optional, but gives cake an extra lemon kick)
  • Lemon peel or fruit, for garnish
  • Glaze

  • 1/4 cup fresh or bottled lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. GENEROUSLY grease a bundt pan (even if it’s nonstick) or two loaf pans. This is important, as this cake will tend to stick to the pan.
  2. Sift flour, salt, and baking powder into a bowl.
  3. Cream butter and cream cheese with electric mixer until smooth. Add flour mixture and beat until stiff, about 5 minutes
  4. Add vanilla and lemon juice, and beat well.
  5. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  6. Spoon the batter into pan(s)
  7. For a bundt pan, bake approximately 1 hour. For a loaf pan, bake approximately 35-40 minutes.
  8. While cake is baking, combine glaze ingredients and set aside.
  9. Use a cake tester or toothpick to check for doneness.
  10. Remove from oven. Use your cake tester to poke the cake with holes, and drizzle glaze over the top. Allow cake to cool throughly before serving, topped with lemon peel for garnish, or accompanied with strawberries or other fruit.

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